Goldie Locks, Connie Goldsmith, and Germs

What do germs have to do with writing? I meet with three of my writing pals, Connie Goldsmith, Patricia Newman (www.patriciamnewman.com) , and Linda Joy Singleton (www.ljsingleton.com ), every other week and we are all so proud of the great press Connie’s latest non-fiction books have been getting that I have to share. Connie_3Check this out:

The National Science Teachers (NSTA) Children’s Book Council chose Connie’s book, Influenza, the Next Pandemic? (Lerner 2007) as an Outstanding Trade Book. "A seamless blend of history and science!" Believe, me , it’s true! I am not a scientist (I blew up the lab in my high school Chemistry class…), and fear of needles kept me from pursuing any medical profession so I need stuff like influenza and pandemics explained to me in user-friendly terms, with an entertaining voice to keep my eyes from slamming shut, and Connie does just that.

NSTA Children’s Book Council: "The author…describe(s) the impact of the flu on generations before us, the impact of another possible pandemic, and how to prevent and care for patients with the flu. Vignettes interConnie_4spersed throughout the book make this important book real for readers."

Next out will be another book that has gotten our group to wash hands more frequently, SUPERBUGS STRIKE BACK, When AntiConnie_5_3biotics Fail  (Lerner 2007). These titles followed INVISIBLE INVADERS, Dangerous Infectious Diseases (Lerner 2006) which the School Library Journal called: "…clear, clever headed and brisk, intelligent writing that never patronizes." Way to go, Connie! For more info on all three titles, go to www.lernerbooks.com .

And speaking of germs, my lesson plans for Goldie Locks Has Chicken Pox prompted Goldie_cover_largean e-mail from a wonderful Kindergarten Mom who helps in her daughter’s classroom. Missy shared this cool Germ experiment she used after she read the Kinders my book:

I cut potatoes into slices. I gave each table several slices. In one group they touched them all over and we put them in a baggie. Another group washed their hands first and then handled them before placing them in a baggie. The third group touched them all over but then spread hand santizer all over their potato slices before putting them in a baggie. The last table didn’t touch their potatoes at all. They used a set of tongs to put the slices in a baggie. I labeled each baggie with how the potatoes were treated. We decided to wait one week and check on the potato slices and see how they look. We made predictions ahead of time and will compare those with how the potatoes really did. FUN!!!

Suddenly I feel like washing my hands…and then it’s time to PBIC… and Write!

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